Ukrainian Food Preparation

We get a lot of questions about how to cook our great Ukrainian food so we’ve made this page that contains a little bit of history on each dish, as well as cooking instructions and suggested sauces. Hopefully with this information you can get that “just like Baba used to make it” taste. Smachnoho!



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Pierogi (Varenyky)

Few things are more Ukrainian than the Perogy. The origin of the dish is debated with numerous Slavic cultures having close ties to this pinched-dough-delight. The etymological origin of Perogy comes from the proto-Slavic ‘piru’ and means feast and has traditionally been seen as much more than simply delicious half-moon carbohydrates. The dish played a ritualistic role by being a talisman and would be taken to the fields to help bring harvest riches.


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Sour Cabbage Rolls (Holubtsi)

Cabbage rolls have an international history dating back over 2,000 years ago. They came from the Middle East moving to Eastern Europe as trade routes flourished and various ethnic groups migrated.


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Sweet Cabbage Rolls (Holubtsi)

Holubtsi are a popular dish for both everyday meal and as special occasion treat. For Sviata Vecheria (Christmas Eve Supper) in many regions of Ukraine holubtsi constitute one of the twelve traditional dishes served on the night.


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Blueberry Perogies

You’ve probably heard of savory pierogi – those delicious Ukrainian dumplings – but what about sweet? These blueberry-filled pierogi are a unique and fruity after-dinner dessert. 


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Fried Perogies

These crispy savoury perogies are filled with our Potato & Cheddar filling. They say Deep fried food tastes better, you can be the judge of that.


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Cheese Buns (Perishke)

Perishke are Ukrainian and Russian baked or fried yeast-leavened boat-shaped buns with a variety of fillings. Perishke are a popular street food and comfort food in Ukraine.


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Cheese Crepes (Nalysnyky)

Crepes have a long history that sees the first pancake over 30,000 years ago.  In that time it grew in popularity in europe where the Crepe was created in northwest region of modern France called Brittany in the 12th century.  It grew in popularity all through europe from Savoury to sweet crepes.


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Ukrainian Sausage (Kovbasa)

Sausage goes as far back to 3100 BC in Mesopotamia, modern day Iraq, Kuwait and par of Saudi Arabia. It world travel into europe where countries adapted to this new form of meat. It wasn’t until in the 1800s Poland introduced the world to Kielbasa. A fantastic, garlicky pork sausage that comes in a wide range of flavours.  Eventually soon after Kielbasa found it way into Western Ukrainian to what we have today.


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Kutia

Kutia or Kutya is a ceremonial grain dish with sweet gravy traditionally served by Eastern Orthodox Christians in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia during the Christmas – Feast of Jordan holiday season and/or as part of a funeral feast. The word with a descriptor is also used to describe the eves of Christmas, New Year, and Feast of Jordan days.


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Beet Soup (Borscht)

Borscht derives from an ancient soup originally cooked from pickled stems, leaves and umbels of common hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), a herbaceous plant growing in damp meadows, which lent the dish its Slavic name. With time, it evolved into a diverse array of tart soups, among which the beet-based red borscht has become the most popular.


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Cabbage Soup (Kapusnyak)

Cabbage soup may refer to any of the variety of soups based on various cabbages, or on sauerkraut and known under different names in national cuisines. Often it is a vegetable soup it may be prepared with different ingredients. Vegetarian cabbage soup may use mushroom stock, or another variety is with  fish stock. Traditional cabbage soup is prepared using a pork stock.



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Dill Sauce

Ukrainians love their creamy dill sauce, they put it on many different items.  It’s very easy to make just click the button above for our recipe.

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